Truncatable primes

From the Project Euler

Problem 37:

The number 3797 has an interesting property. Being prime itself, it is possible to continuously remove digits from left to right, and remain prime at each stage: 3797, 797, 97, and 7. Similarly we can work from right to left: 3797, 379, 37, and 3.
Find the sum of the only eleven primes that are both truncatable from left to right and right to left.
NOTE: 2, 3, 5, and 7 are not considered to be truncatable primes.

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Double-base palindromes

From the Project Euler

Problem 36:

The decimal number, 585 = 10010010012 (binary), is palindromic in both bases.
Find the sum of all numbers, less than one million, which are palindromic in base 10 and base 2.
(Please note that the palindromic number, in either base, may not include leading zeros.)

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Circular primes

From the Project Euler

Problem 35:

The number, 197, is called a circular prime because all rotations of the digits: 197, 971, and 719, are themselves prime.
There are thirteen such primes below 100: 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 31, 37, 71, 73, 79, and 97.
How many circular primes are there below one million?

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Digit factorials

From the Project Euler

Problem 34:

145 is a curious number, as 1! + 4! + 5! = 1 + 24 + 120 = 145.
Find the sum of all numbers which are equal to the sum of the factorial of their digits.
Note: as 1! = 1 and 2! = 2 are not sums they are not included.

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Digit canceling fractions

From the Project Euler

Problem 33:

The fraction 49/98 is a curious fraction, as an inexperienced mathematician in attempting to simplify it may incorrectly believe that 49/98 = 4/8, which is correct, is obtained by cancelling the 9s.
We shall consider fractions like, 30/50 = 3/5, to be trivial examples.
There are exactly four non-trivial examples of this type of fraction, less than one in value, and containing two digits in the numerator and denominator.
If the product of these four fractions is given in its lowest common terms, find the value of the denominator.

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Pandigital products

From the Project Euler

Problem 32:

We shall say that an n-digit number is pandigital if it makes use of all the digits 1 to n exactly once; for example, the 5-digit number, 15234, is 1 through 5 pandigital.
The product 7254 is unusual, as the identity, 39 × 186 = 7254, containing multiplicand, multiplier, and product is 1 through 9 pandigital.
Find the sum of all products whose multiplicand/multiplier/product identity can be written as a 1 through 9 pandigital.
HINT: Some products can be obtained in more than one way so be sure to only include it once in your sum.

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Coin sums

From the Project Euler

Problem 31:

In England the currency is made up of pound, £, and pence, p, and there are eight coins in general circulation:
1p, 2p, 5p, 10p, 20p, 50p, £1 (100p) and £2 (200p).
It is possible to make £2 in the following way:
1×£1 + 1×50p + 2×20p + 1×5p + 1×2p + 3×1p
How many different ways can £2 be made using any number of coins?

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Digit fifth powers

From the Project Euler

Problem 30:

Surprisingly there are only three numbers that can be written as the sum of fourth powers of their digits:
1634 = 14 + 64 + 34 + 44
8208 = 84 + 24 + 04 + 84
9474 = 94 + 44 + 74 + 44
As 1 = 14 is not a sum it is not included.
The sum of these numbers is 1634 + 8208 + 9474 = 19316.
Find the sum of all the numbers that can be written as the sum of fifth powers of their digits.

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Distinct powers

From the Project Euler

Problem 29:

Consider all integer combinations of ab for 2 ≤ a ≤ 5 and 2 ≤ b ≤ 5:

22=4, 23=8, 24=16, 25=32
32=9, 33=27, 34=81, 35=243
42=16, 43=64, 44=256, 45=1024
52=25, 53=125, 54=625, 55=3125

If they are then placed in numerical order, with any repeats removed, we get the following sequence of 15 distinct terms:

4, 8, 9, 16, 25, 27, 32, 64, 81, 125, 243, 256, 625, 1024, 3125

How many distinct terms are in the sequence generated by ab for 2 ≤ a ≤ 100 and 2 ≤ b ≤ 100?

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without computing any power

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Number spiral diagonals

From the Project Euler

Problem 28:

Starting with the number 1 and moving to the right in a clockwise direction a 5 by 5 spiral is formed as follows:

21 22 23 24 25
20  7  8  9 10
19  6  1  2 11
18  5  4  3 12
17 16 15 14 13

It can be verified that the sum of the numbers on the diagonals is 101.

What is the sum of the numbers on the diagonals in a 1001 by 1001 spiral formed in the same way?

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